Review of ‘The Weight of Lies’ by Emily Carpenter

The Weight of LiesThe Weight of Lies by Emily Carpenter

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Summary provided by the publisher:

In this gripping, atmospheric family drama, a young woman investigates the forty­-year­-old murder that inspired her mother’s bestselling novel, and uncovers devastating truths—and dangerous lies.

Reformed party girl Meg Ashley leads a life of privilege, thanks to a bestselling horror novel her mother wrote decades ago. But Meg knows that the glow of their very public life hides a darker reality of lies, manipulation, and the heartbreak of her own solitary childhood. Desperate to break free of her mother, Meg accepts a proposal to write a scandalous, tell-all memoir.

Digging into the past—and her mother’s cult classic—draws Meg to Bonny Island, Georgia, and an unusual woman said to be the inspiration for the book. At first island life seems idyllic, but as Meg starts to ask tough questions, disturbing revelations come to light…including some about her mother.

Soon Meg’s search leads her to question the facts of a decades-old murder. She’s warned to leave it alone, but as the lies pile up, Meg knows she’s getting close to finding a murderer. When her own life is threatened, Meg realizes the darkness found in her mother’s book is nothing compared to the chilling truth that lurks off the page.

———————————————————————————————————————————– The Weight of Lies is a wonderful book full of mystery and thrills that really kept me on my toes until the very end!

So, let me start by saying that I really loved this book!!!

One of the main reasons I think I liked it, was the mystery surrounding a young girl’s death over forty years prior, which had served as the “inspiration” for the murder/mystery best-seller by MC Meg’s mother, Frances Ashley. Honestly, Frances Ashley’s book came off as a sort of cheap knockoff version of Truman Capote‘s In Cold Blood–in the sense that it was basically the story of a real crime (though there happens to be a major embellishment I will not mention here)–and the reason it worked, was because it came out in a time when America was really into books and movies about creepy kids (think Rosemary’s Baby and the like).

Ashley’s book, therefore, becomes a cult phenomenon, which leads to her becoming extremely wealthy, and eventually leads to her partying, trust-fund daughter Meg resenting her. It’s really stereotypical, with Meg pretty much screaming poor, little, rich girl, but it does help lead up to Meg’s eventual decision to write a tell-all about her mother, which happens to include a new investigation into the murder that inspired her mother’s best-seller…

It’s when Meg finally makes it to Bonny Island–the very island the murder had taken place on, and the very island Frances had been when she’d first met the inspirations behind her novel–that the story really takes off. I had had no problem learning a bit of Meg’s back-story, as well as that of her mother, but when we are finally able to start digging into the mysteries of Bonny Island, and the resident that is said to have inspired a particular character in the novel, then we’re able to really start feeling the thriller aspect of this book.

And were there thrills!!

I absolutely love the idea of the MC having the sense that there’s someone on their trail as they’re investigating…someone who’s combing over the evidence they discover, in an attempt to eventually throw some sort of wrench into their investigation, and finally, someone who will have the MC feeling a strong sense of discomfort, thus becoming a real, possible threat in the end. Yup, all the hallmarks of a Lifetime thriller, I know, but we are all allowed our guilty pleasures, aren’t we?

One more thing, before I finish this review, and besides the fact that I did love the small cast of characters, I just didn’t really feel the need to go too in depth when it comes to that…is that I loved the way Frances’ book, the infamous Kitten, is somewhat shared through excerpts in-between chapters of main storyline. It really helps you get a sense of why her book was considered horror, and why the person who is the inspiration behind the fictional
Kitten
becomes such a fascinating character that you just can’t seem to stop thinking about.

Well, there we are with my review. As I’d already mentioned before, I really loved this book, so that being the case, I will be more than glad to recommend it to others.

Thank you to Lake Union Publishing via Netgalley for giving me this copy in exchange for an honest review.

View all my reviews

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